Vermont legislator hopes to transform his “Adverse Legislative Experience (ALE)”

ImageThe principal sponsor of the Vermont ACEs bill, Dr. George Till, has an ALE (not a typo) score of at least one. He describes losing six of seven sections of the ACEs legislation as an “Adverse Legislative Experience (ALE)”. But if re-elected this November, he plans to “push again next session” for provisions to embed the ACEs research findings into medical practice. While “extremely disappointed” with the outcome of the conference committee dropping most of his bill’s provisions, his resiliency is evident as he looks ahead to the next opportunity to improve health outcomes.

On May 10, the last day of the Vermont legislature, a broad healthcare bill (H. 596) passed that included the one remaining ACEs provision. This section mandates a review by Jan. 15, 2015 of “evidence-based materials on the relationship between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and population health and recommend to the General Assembly whether, how, and at what expense ACE-informed medical practice should be integrated into

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DOJ official advocates for juvenile justice reforms

I expected the luncheon keynoter at the American Bar Association–American Psychological Association “Confronting Family and Community Violence” meeting in Washington, D.C., last week to be informative, even impressive, but not necessarily inspiring and motivating. Robert L. Listenbee Jr. was all of these. Demonstrating how important cross-disciplinary conversations are, his words were as relevant to the psychologists in the room as they were for the lawyers.

Listenbee, administrator of the U.S. Justice Department’s Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, served as co-chair, with former Yankees manager Joe Torre, of the National Task Force on Children Exposed to Violence. He mentioned the importance remembering what the ACE Study tells us when he talked about how Joe Torre’s childhood trauma impacted his adult life. Here are a few other highlights of his talk on May 2:Image

—The $1.5 million Academy of Sciences report “Reforming Juvenile Justice: A Developmental Approach” has been criticized for not providing new knowledge, but the NAS-certification (an institution he noted

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Georgia juvenile court judge galvanizes statewide child trauma initiatives

Judge

Douglas County (GA) Juvenile Court Judge Peggy Walker and “Dalton”

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Douglas County Juvenile Court Judge Peggy Walker is an activist judge for the children of Georgia – the children she loves who do not get what they need for healthy, successful lives.  She’s seen how the children are failed when they come back to court again and again. Now she’s doing something about it.  When she takes over later this year as the president of the National Council of Juvenile and Family Court Judges, she’ll have a national platform to promote changes in polices and practices to prevent and treat childhood trauma.  For now, she is spreading the word around the state of Georgia through conferences in four different regions, with the first one held January 10 at the Carter Center in Atlanta.

Woven into Judge Walker’s Georgia Summit on Complex Trauma keynote address to more than 400 participants —  including judges, their staffs, child and family services professionals, and advocates — was a description of a painful case from her work as a judge.  She began her presentation on what science tells us to do for children who have experienced complex trauma with a photo of herself (shown above) holding “Dalton.” He was the first drug-free child in the court’s family drug treatment program; his mother “Tonya” was a participant (both names are pseudonyms).

During the 10 years that “Tonya” had been in and out of her court, Judge Walker did not know her story. When she found out, she learned that  “Tonya’s” mother was alcoholic, emotionally abusive, and manipulative.  At age seven, “Tonya” was raped by a 50-year-old neighbor who was later incarcerated but freed after three years.  She tried drug treatment in

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The shame of incarceration: new evidence on sexual victimization

The power of data to combat denial and distortion is dramatically illustrated in “The Shame of Our Prisons:  New Evidence,” a review of studies carried in the October 24 issue of the New York Review of Books by David Kaiser, chair of the board of Just Detention International (JDI) and Lovisa Stannow, JDI’s executive director. Kaiser and Stannow say that the uniform denial of the widespread problem of prison rape has changed now that good data is available. The carefully conducted surveys by the Justice Department’s Bureau of Justice Statistics (BJS) reviewed by Kaiser and Stannow have found consistent findings: “The same factors that put inmates at risk of sexual abuse show up again and again, as do the same patterns of abuse involving race and gender, inmates and guards.” The data discredits the assertion by prison officials in recent years that inmates fabricate claims of sexual victimization in order to cause trouble.

Kaiser and Stannow report that the studies [Sexual Victimization in Prisons and Jails Reported by Inmates, 2011-12: BJS National Inmate Survey (NIS) and Sexual Victimization in Juvenile Facilities Reported by Youth, 2012: BJS National Survey of Youth in Custody (NSYC)] confirm important findings from earlier surveys (e.g., extraordinary numbers of female inmates and guards commit sexual

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Reduce ACEs by dismantling the “prison industrial complex”

prisonWhen I was a child growing up in Kentucky, my father made regular visits − usually at night − to the local jail to provide medical care to inmates. In one way or another, substances were the root cause of both their illnesses and their incarceration. My teetotaler father had other gritty experiences with alcohol, finding himself from a young age getting his beloved “Uncle Ed” out of the drunk tank over and over again.

Elements of these recollections from the 1950s and 60s are as universal today as ever — the impact of substance abuse on the individual, the ripple effect of addiction and incarceration on the family, imprisonment instead of treatment — but the explosion in the rates of incarceration in this country have created a crisis of proportions unthinkable in the post-WWII era. According to the Pew Charitable Trust report, Collateral Costs: Incarceration’s Effect on Economic Mobility, there are now 2.3 million

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